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OPTOMETRIST'S GUIDE TO EYELASH EXTENSIONS CARE v2.0

 

New for 2020 are some beautiful We Love Eyes products for my patients that wear eyelash extensions. Here I will review the new items and how to use them after eyelash extensions are installed.  

I can’t express enough – that when it comes to lash loss, debris build up, or an eye infection… DO NOT blame the lash artist! For whatever reason, my patients just stop washing. Failure to wash the eyelids every night will prevent the lash from expressing it’s true beauty. 



for everyday cleaning







This is my beautiful new formula. It’s 100% oil free and loaded with highly beneficial ingredients to keep your lash extensions clean and enjoyable to wear.  

My Key Ingredients:

  • Tea Tree Water - naturally antiseptic and cleansing for the meibomian eyelid glands
  • Rose Water - gently cooling for eyelids stressed with eye makeup
  • Centella Asiatica Extract - anti-inflammatory and rich in vitamin C, A, B1 & B2, niacin, and carotene, which combine to brighten skin
  • Willow Bark Extract - has anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines
  • Coconut Fruit Extract - rich in amino acids, minerals, proteins and vitamins which refresh and moisturize the skin
  • Yucca Schidigera Root Extract - a natural soaping agent safe for the tear film and those that wear contacts

Here are 4 steps to a cleaner and healthier lash extensions experience. I also have a video tutorial.

 

Step 1: Place a half pump of Tea Tree Water Foaming Cleanser onto my Eyelid Margin Cleansing Brush. 






Step 2: Keep your eyelid closed. Use the brush to wash the entire upper eyelid with the foam. The brush allows for precise product placement and complete control. Target the eyelash margin where debris like bacteria and demodex tend to build up. Remember not to get the foam inside the eye (it’s a soap and will sting). 







Step 3: Rinse the brush under lukewarm water and tap the brush on a towel to blot any excess water.






Step 4: Use the brush to wipe away any soapy residue. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until all soapy residue is completely gone. Remember you are cleaning the eyelids, not the inside of the eyes. Wash the brush with the Tea Tree Water foaming cleanser and lay flat to dry after each use.


 

 

for that eye buildup

 


For my patients that tend to get that ‘white line’ of buildup at the base of the lash - you will want to add this duo to the above routine. If not addressed, this debris will accumulate and become very difficult to remove. It is also the tell tale sign of an impending eyelid infection – such as a stye. This clinical finding must be taken very seriously.


Here I will walk you through on how to use this duo to properly remove eyelid debris buildup. There is also a video tutorial.




Step 1: Spray the Hypochlorous Cleansing Spray onto the In Between Eyelash Cleansing Brush. The cleansing spray is 100% oil free and will NOT sting inside the eyes. 

 





Step 2: Gently stoke with an up and down motion to ensure you get all the debris out. The forked bristles and angled handle ensure precise placement in between the lashes while avoiding contact with the cornea.

 

 

Step 3: Debris can transfer from the top lid to the bottom. Repeat step 2 on the bottom eyelids as well. 







Step 4: Wash the brush with the Tea Tree Water Foaming Cleanser and lay flat to dry after each use.




 

wear water based eye makeup

 

One of the biggest culprits to damaged lash extensions is waterproof eyeliner and mascara. I remind my patients to never use any waterproof eye makeup because they will need an oil based remover which can weaken the adhesive joint of the lash extension. 


In addition, waterproof eye makeup tends to have a more toxic ingredient profile that can cause tear film instability and make eyes look less white.

 

see me, your optometrist

 

Well, maybe not exactly me, lol. 

If your eyes feel dry, look or feel red, or if you feel a stye simmering at the eyelid – call your optometrist. 

I’ve had to prescribe drops for some of my patients to help them with dryness after lash extensions. It was temporary, but the drops certainly helped their tear volume and comfort. I’ve also had a couple cases go from lash extension to stye to preseptal cellulitis. The eyes are close to the sinuses which are close to the brain. So with any eyelid infection that starts spreading towards the sinus - it can be life threatening. The eye will feel ‘hot,’ feel painful and it will look like you’re wearing pink or red eye shadow.  Don’t hesitate. Run to your optometrist. 

Enjoy your journey with gorgeous lashes the right and healthy way. When in doubt - always ask your eye care professional. 

Let us do the dirty work. 

 

Dr. Tanya Gill, O.D. is the clinic director of Oakland Vision Center Optometry in Oakland, CA, USA. She graduated from the UC Berkeley School of Optometry in 1999 and is on a mission to clean every dirty eyelid in the world, including yours.